10/24/14

Day 2 - Chasing Chiltons Tuesday - part 1

Our goal on Day 2 was tracking down some more of Dave's genealogy, so off we went on the train to Kent to visit Sandwich and Canterbury.

It was a beautiful day and the countryside was interesting to look at as we went along - we LOVE traveling by train!
look at that traffic!  glad we didn't drive!

When we got to Canterbury West station, we had to walk over a pedestrian bridge to get to the carpark where our friend Jenny Baker was kind enough to pick us up...I was able to get a great shot of our train...

and a view of the tracks on the other side of the bridge...
 
Jenny was so kind to offer to drive us around, so we hopped in her car and headed off to Sandwich, the location of the first church.
 
Sandwich has a population of about 5,000 and is very historic - it was one of the Cinque Ports on the River Stour and still contains many medieval buildings - in 1028 King Canute granted a charter to the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury to operate a ferry across the river and collect tolls -
part of the City Wall and the Great Bulwark

Look!  We could live there!
Fisher Gate - dates from 1384 and the only original medieval town gate to survive
Dave's 11th great-grandparents (James Chilton) worshipped at three churches in Kent - one was St. Peter's in Sandwich from 1601-1605.  More importantly, Dave's Mayflower ancestor, Mary Chilton (dau. of James) was baptised in this church in 1605.  Mary was a teenager when she accompanied her parents on the Mayflower to the New World and survived to marry the brother of Governor Winslow.

From the carpark we had to walk up Seven Post Alley (no visible reason for the name), which must be the same size it has been for the last 600 years...
 
and by coming from that direction, we came to the church from the back...
A Norman church stood on the site by about 1100 but was probably destroyed in an attack by the French in 1216; it was rebuilt during the 13th century and during the 14th century, the North aisle was widened/raised in height, a chapel was built on the South aisle, and a porch was added on the North.  The tower collapsed in 1661, destroying the South side with the tower being rebuilt with an added cupola. The church was restored in the 19th century.  In 1948 the parish of St. Peter's was united with those of St. Mary's and St. Clement's and St. Peter's was closed for regular worship; it was declared redundant in 1973 and was vested in the Churches Conservation Trust in 1974.
 
At least it is open to the public for viewing - it was great to be able to get pictures of Dave at the church door and at the original baptismal font where Mary was baptised...

 
and it was a nice place to spend some time...we can always find stuff to look at and photograph, even without the family connection!

I'm particularly drawn to memorials - both for their art (sometimes) and for their stories (sometimes) - or just for their genealogy...

The one above is a veritable genealogical treasure trove:
In a Vault on the outside of this wall are deposited the remains of Katherine Harvey, youngest daughter of Samuel Harvey Esq. and Katherine his Wife, who on the eve of her intended marriage was suddenly attacked with the alarming symptoms of a rapid decline which closed her prospects of earthly felicity, separated her from all family and endearing connexions and terminated her existence in this World by removing her to a better on the 28th day of May, 1807, aged 23 years.
Likewise were removed into the same vault the remains of Ann Isabella the wife of Lieut. Col. Harvey, only son of Samuel and Katherine Harvey, and daughter of William Pinder Esq. of the Island of Barbadoes, who also died of a decline on the 4th day of Feb 1807, in the 28th year of her age, leaving issue one son.
Let the young and cheerful learn from hence, that sublunary happiness is vain and uncertain, and that only beyond the Grave true joys are to be found.
ALSO to the memory of the above Willm. Maundy Harvey Esq., Lieut. Colonel of the 979th Regiment of Foot, Colonel in the British Army, Brigadier General in the Portuguese Service and a Knight Commander of the Portuguese Order of the Tower and Sword; he died at sea on his passage home from Lisbon on the 10th of June, 1815, aged 38 years, and was buried in the Atlantic Ocean in Lat. 45.37. Long.9.42.

Wow.


 
And the grounds and gardens were wonderful - I wish we had had the time to explore the entire grounds and visit Sandwich itself...



This window is a remnant from the St. Thomas' Hospital which once stood nearby.


But, we had a schedule to keep - we had to see another church in Canterbury, grab some lunch, and then meet the Rector at the third church (also in Canterbury)...so on to Church #2...

10/21/14

Day 1 - London - Part 5

The walk back to Westminster Bridge was nice, little to see...
the sturgeon lamps by Vulliamy...


A dog in the park preoccupied with his stick...it so reminded me of Ame` - I swear that Labs are part beaver!

A garden gate in an otherwise featureless brick wall...

And then the walk was entirely worthwhile when we came upon "South of the River" by Schottlander...it was wonderful how it changed as we walked past and changed our perspective of the piece...



and then we were back at Westminster Bridge, across the river from where we started...and, of course, there was a lot of stuff to see!

We made a new friend on the bridge...












Saw the South Bank LIon (aka the Coade Lion)

Enjoyed the distance view of Westminster Palace...

On the Thames side of the County Hall, there were more sculptures..."Benevolence and Humanity" by Cole...
Benevolence

Humanity
as well as another untitled work by Cole

It was a nice end to a long day as we made our way back across the bridge to the Underground...




Bodicea up close was pretty cool...

and it was nice that she is right outside the Underground entrance!  It was time for dinner and bed!