9/19/14

Excursion - Lunch and a jump...

After the boats, the bus took us up into the hills outside of Oslo proper to have lunch at Frognerseter...the oldest part of the building was completed in 1891 with a renovation in 1909 to what it looks like today...seems they do a big business with buffet meals for groups, receptions...the place has always been run as a restaurant with accommodations and is now owned by Oslo Municipality and has a reputation as one of the finest restaurants serving Norwegian cuisine.
their website says: The house was designed by architect Holm Munthe and
is held in the time typical Dragon style...pretty sure it's a weird translation
the buffet had a tasty selection of seafood, meats and vegetables...
I wasn't thrilled to be watched over by stuffed creatures, but it probably
suits the "hunting/ski lodge" atmosphere they were seriously attempting...

Our lunch companions included Robb and Alison Watt from Canada...

 And I can easily see why going up there is worth it, besides the delicious food...the view was wonderful!
an interesting view of Oslo...even if it was a little hazy...



























Dave with the Pro Heraldica team!
David B. Appleton, Alexandra Rittner, Rolf Sutter, Harald Heimbach,
Petra Heimbach, David E. Rencher and Greg Flores
(I'm not sure who took the picture, but Pro Heraldica posted it on Facebook,
which was great because we could grab a copy for our scrapbook!).




 But the real reason (I think) for picking that particular restaurant is to be able to show us the Holmenkollen.  That means Olympic Ski Jump in every language...and the Norwegians are very proud of it...there has been a ski jump there since 1892.  Since then there has been many extensions and renovations (~19) and the current hill was opened in 2010.
it is made of 8 steel sections and weighs more than 1,000 tons
it is currently the only steel ski jump in the world and is considered an engineering feat

those walls are permanent wind shields (the top portion is about 200 feet in the air)
...the dark grey portion is the jump/ski lane and the lighter grey on each side below the two openings are for the spectators...according to the guide book, the average speed for good jumps is around 90 kmph (~60 mph) and they fly for 4 seconds before landing...



this is the view from the approach...

and this picture was posted by JDS Architects, the jump's designers
and shows the structure in winter...brrrr...
from Wikipedia -
showing spectators along the run...
This picture by Nancy Budt from Innovation Norway gives you an idea of the stadium at the bottom and how it fills with people during an event...

...It's from before the construction done for the 2011 World Ski Championship, but it's still an impressive shot.

To be honest, it took me a while to figure out at which point on the run the "jump" part begins...I had to look at a few more pictures on the internet showing jumpers to figure it out

It was difficult to see on the bare structure with no one actually making a jump... silly me...I've actually watched jumps from Oslo on television but I thought it was just some mountain they were skiing down after the jump; didn't realize the entire thing was a structure!

During events, no private vehicles are allowed (the parking lot where our bus stopped was pretty small) and transportation to the site is provided by the Oslo Metro...as for the road up there, it was quite a squeeze on some of the turns for our bus, I'm not sure why anyone would want to drive on that road during the Winter anyway...

next up - the infamous Vigeland Sculpture Park...


9/16/14

Excursion - The Viking Ship Museum

From The "Guide" from the Universitetets Oldsaksamling (1987):

The Oseberg ship was excavated in 1904...part of an exceptionally...equipped burial...the ship and many of the objects in it were broken into thousands of small fragments...After almost 15 weeks of work, the find was finally securely stored in Oslo...all the pieces of the ship had been measured and numbered during the excavation...the ship was rebuilt in a temporary building in the grounds of the University...In 1926 it was moved to the Viking Ship Hall...One of the sledges was pieced together from 1,061 fragments...the only Viking Age wagon found in Norway as yet is this one from Oseberg...the Gokstad ship was excavated in 1880 and moved to the Hall in 1929...whereas the Oseberg find included 4 sledges and a wagon, the Gokstad burial was equipped with one sledge and three small boats...the [burial] chambers [of both ships] were tent-shaped...

...and then my eyes glazed over and I stopped reading...

Basically, everything was wrecked when it was found, but enterprising engineers and archeologists perservered and managed to put everything back together, preserving the wood with the latest technology (and linseed oil).

The ship-building was phenominal and the carving was over-the-top; all I could think was that Norwegian winters must certainly be long...


Oseburg










Those who have known me for a long time, will understand when I say
this reminds me of a friend who is also a carving artist...
I thought at the time that if he could see the stuff in this museum,
his head would probably explode...he would love spending time reproducing
some of the things I saw...


burial chamber and boats (Gokstad)

Gokstad

 
Next up...more ships...of the Pacific, Atlantic and Polar kind...

9/14/14

Dave's Birthday!

We interrupt the travelogue to bring you Dave's Birthday!!!

After a regular Saturday morning, we dressed up...

and went to the Chocolate Festival in Addison...very crowded, but it was nice to meet the vendors - the outside section was vendors who sold ingredients and items for making chocolates and the inner section was chocolatiers and restaurants who specialized in a chocolate dessert...

and everyone had samples and/or items for sale...



Afterwards, we sat outside for a little while to recover...and Dave took a moment to read his many good wishes on Facebook and in text messages...

The weather was wonderful (we think Fall may be here...), so we walked around the area just to see what was there...

There were Men at Work...
...making pizza...

...and getting ready for Oktoberfest...
and just interesting things to see...







Then we went back to the car and headed over to our favorite bookstore for books and something small to tide us over for a few hours...


We took a side trip to locate the next restaurant on our hit list before heading to Local in time for our reservation...

Where Chef Tracy Miller outdid herself in the preparation of our steak special...

Dave finished it off with one of their home-made min-sundaes...I don't know where he found the room!

It was a lot of fun!

Happy 66th Dave!!